GEOFFREY BAWA: COLOMBO RESIDENCE

Geoffrey Bawa’s Colombo residence, Number 11, showcases a raw yet refined aesthetic. The renowned Sri Lanken architect bought and renovated the third in a row of four small houses. As the remaining bungalows became available, Bawa converted the whole block into one home -including a four story tower in the design. He successfully and beautifully blends twentieth century european modernism with traditional Sri Lanken design. Number 11 houses art and artefacts from the collection of the late architect, and  is now open to the public for tours and overnight stays. 

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Photography: Dominque Brammah via In/Out 

HUESO RESTAURANT: MEXICO

Located in Guadalajara, Mexico, a 1940’s building has been refurbished to house Alfonso Cadena’s new restaurant ‘Hueso’. The name of the restaurant originates from the spanish word for bone, which Cadena + Asociados (the owner’s brother) have taken quite literally with their concept. The design studio aimed to create a ‘double skin’ - a smooth outer skin protecting a more organic inner skin. The exterior is clad in handmade bone white tiles with a black linear design, a single bone on a chain above the entrance is the only clue as to what is inside. Over 10 000 bones cover the impressive internal walls, along with anatomical drawings and cooking utensils. The primarily monochromatic textural surfaces sit in contrast with the smooth timber tables and chairs. The menu continues with the theme, offering a variety of meats. This is a restaurant I would love to experience. 

Photography: Jaime Navarro

Photography: Jaime Navarro

THE LABYRINTH OF XAVIER CORBERO.

The incredible evolving home of sculptor Xavier Corbero in Espluges de Llobregat, near Barcelona, was inspired by the surrounding landscapes nooks and crannies. Corbero wanted to create a space to "spread my sculptures, a placid place to think and listen to music", the result of which, a lifelong project, is the beautiful and fascinating 5000m2 labyrinth pictured. 

Photography: Jerome Galland for Architectural Digest

Photography: Jerome Galland for Architectural Digest

FAYE TOOGOOD'S LONDON HOME.

Faye Toogood likes to "combine the precious and the raw", which is evident in the designer's delightful late Georgian London home. The balance of antique and modern, fine and flea market, creates a space that feels refined yet cozy. Unlike her professional work (which goes through a rigorous design process), Faye describes her home as a much more personal space that has evolved over time - a series of objects not purposefully put together.

Photography: Henry Bourne via nytimes.com 

Photography: Henry Bourne via nytimes.com 

JOSEPH DIRAND'S PARIS APARTMENT.

Architect Joseph Dirand's Bellechasse apartment is a study of balance and harmony. The warm and liveable minimal space has been created through the use of sensuous materials, a neutral palette and carefully selected furniture. The design is pure and functional, while it is the materiality that brings beauty to the home. In the New York Times article 'The Reinvention of Minimalism' Joseph insists that he designed this space not as a showpiece, but just as a home - somewhere he can enjoy life (I certainly could enjoy life here!). 

Photography: Simon Watson

Photography: Simon Watson

HARBOUR EDGE HOUSE BY FEARON HAY ARCHITECTS.

Originally built in 1910, this gorgeous waterfront villa was recently updated by Fearon Hay Architects. The simplicity and elegance of the New Zealand home is underpinned by the restrained palette and materials used - whites, travertine, leather and brass. These choices allow the old and the new to blend seamlessly, while also allowing details such as the kitchen cabinetry and that stunning fireplace to shine. 

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